This auction is being sold exclusively online. Bids can be left on this site or bidding live in real time via the-saleroom. The lot consists of Waffenrock military coat with eight-button front, fine feldgrau wool, Swedish cuffs and Waffenfarbe piping to collar, cuffs, front closure and rear vent, aguillette. M37 officer’s tunic, silver braided belt with clasp, visor cap with badge, enlisted army dress bayonet with hangers. An associated copy of Mein Kampf. Not much is known about the officer as he was fairly secretive. He was partially disabled and later had an involvement with the Nazi Party. Worked in Berlin and trained the Infantry to ski in the mountains as part of the Alpine Corps training. The vendor received the collection from the elderly serviceman as a gift.

The Brodie Helmet and its Derivatives

German steel helmet M accepted for service in , was considered to be the best sample of military protective clothing of that time by the end of the Second World War. M prototype became a model M sample of , which was used in the first world war. M became lighter, the sizes of its peak and cone neck-flap, covering ears from a soundwave and fragments, changed. However despite of this figure a helmet could only save from fragment wounds.

As for a bullet wound even from a small caliber gun it could hardly give any chances to its owner. Also as for the disadvantages of a helmet, it was a relative complexity in production and, as a result, high cost.

File history. Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Brodie helmet · Kettle hat · Combat helmet. Usage on

Either your web browser doesn’t support Javascript or it is currently turned off. In the latter case, please turn on Javascript support in your web browser and reload this page. All the data underlying the analysis can be found in a public repository hosted by the Duke Data Repository. Since World War I, helmets have been used to protect the head in warfare, designed primarily for protection against artillery shrapnel.

More recently, helmet requirements have included ballistic and blunt trauma protection, but neurotrauma from primary blast has never been a key concern in helmet design. Only in recent years has the threat of direct blast wave impingement on the head—separate from penetrating trauma—been appreciated. Helmets were mounted on a dummy head and neck and aligned along the crown of the head with a cylindrical shock tube to simulate an overhead blast. Primary blast waves of different magnitudes were generated based on estimated blast conditions from historical shells.

Peak reflected overpressure at the open end of the blast tube was compared to peak overpressure measured at several head locations. All helmets provided significant pressure attenuation compared to the no helmet case. The modern variant did not provide more pressure attenuation than the historical helmets, and some historical helmets performed better at certain measurement locations.

The study demonstrates that both historical and current helmets have some primary blast protective capabilities, and that simple design features may improve these capabilities for future helmet systems. At the start of World War I WWI in July , helmets were not part of the standard military equipment for any of the allied or central powers [ 1 ]. Most headwear consisted of cloth e.

File:British

Here is one, contributed by R. Allen, a veteran of the Middlesex Regiment one of its battalions in the 41st Division , living in Finchley after the war. The raid was the outcome of an order from Headquarters demanding prisoners for information. Everything had been nicely arranged.

Brodie helmet was developed by the British as an attempt to cope up with France in To date, realistic experimental modeling has been a challenge due to.

Many re-issued Brodie helmets worn by the regular pre-war British army would also have been lost in the early unsuccessful campaigns of WW2, most notably the Dunkirk operation. The liner is somewhat unique, being a cross between the WW1 Brodie 2nd pattern version and the WW2 modification. Leather chin band is as per the WW1 helmet, again being period replaced as part of the refurbishment. This listing indicates the price per pair.

Subject transfers are in excellent damage free condition. Underside of dish cover with Grimwade maker details. Very slight age crazing to the surfaces as is common. Chain mail, square eye guard affixed to the helmet with the addition of a rim attachment and side hooks. The helmet shell is in excellent damage free condition, with the addition of the ‘crude’ rim bracket.

Helmet liner is in very good condition and is complete with its chin strap. Liner upper felt cushion.

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The Army has pushed back on a study purporting to show that World War I “tinpot” helmets were just as good or, in some cases, better than the service’s current Advanced Combat Helmet in mitigating the shock wave effects of blasts that can cause traumatic brain injury TBI. The “Brodie” helmet worn by U. The Duke study found that the Adrian helmet resulted in lower crown pressures than the ACH, Brodie and Stahlhelm in testing for shock wave effects from an artillery blast directly overhead.

The Adrian had an unusual crest along its crown.

Original WWII British Brodie Steel Helmet in Desert Tan- WW2 Dated (Desert Rats) in Helmets.

Have you ever stopped to think about where the modern steel helmet came from? In there were in fact no major armies using a steel helmet. None of these offered any protection to the head, and, more specifically, against shrapnel from shells exploding either on the ground or overhead. Unlike the German design, the French and British helmets were said to be based on an ancient design called the Kettle Helm. These were effectively a wide-brimmed hat made of steel and used particularly by the English in the wars against the French in the Middle Ages.

It had a number of advantages: low cost, little maintenance, multiple other uses it looked like a cooking pot after —all! As will be explained, the French were the first to introduce a Kettle-style steel helmet in the Great War and some say the British copied them. Others believe the British were already working on a design and that there are only so-many ways you can actually protect the head — so a Kettle-design was almost inevitable. Perhaps, Dear Reader, you can read on and then let us have your views on this topic.

The French were the first to introduce a steel helmet of sorts — it was actually more of a thin steel liner to be worn under the Kepi, and appeared in early They followed this with the M15 Adrian helmet, consider by some to be the classic French design, which was designed as a general protective helmet but with that distinctive fore-and-aft ridge, or crest, to act as a deflector against shrapnel from overhead shell-bursts, a growing problem in the war.

It was lightweight, relatively easy to make and, by the autumn of , was standard issue to all soldiers. It also had other weaknesses such as holes and slots for mounting badges, as well as a slit under the crest for ventilation and a separately manufactured rim that was joined to the bowl.

Militaria -The VE Day 75th Anniversary Sale

All the data underlying the analysis can be found in a public repository hosted by the Duke Data Repository. Since World War I, helmets have been used to protect the head in warfare, designed primarily for protection against artillery shrapnel. More recently, helmet requirements have included ballistic and blunt trauma protection, but neurotrauma from primary blast has never been a key concern in helmet design.

Only in recent years has the threat of direct blast wave impingement on the head—separate from penetrating trauma—been appreciated. Helmets were mounted on a dummy head and neck and aligned along the crown of the head with a cylindrical shock tube to simulate an overhead blast.

Brodie Helmet with liner dated , black helmet showing divisional mark for the 42nd East Lancs Div or WW11 42nd Armoured Div, it’s believed that.

Mark I Brodie pattern steel helmet, More details: NAM. To mark the centenary of its adoption by the Army, we take a look at how the Brodie was deployed for service. At the outbreak of the First World War, soldiers went into battle with non-metal headwear, which differed depending on where they were stationed. As head injuries from shrapnel and debris increased, a stronger and more resilient helmet became a necessity for soldiers in action.

This made the helmet stronger, and easier to produce. Soldiers wearing the recently issued Brodie helmet on the Western Front, The Brodie design featured a brim 2in 5cm wide, which protected the head and shoulders from above. It also reflected light which could betray field positions. As a result, the helmet was later modified to a light khaki green, and covered with sawdust and cork, giving it a dull and non-reflective surface. The first one million Brodie helmets were distributed in the summer of It was the first helmet given to all serving soldiers in the British and Commonwealth armies, regardless of rank.

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English Brodie helmet

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I have a Brodie helmet – handed down to me from relations in red diamonds so given the date of the helmet, that can be discarded.

Original Sir Oswald Mosley hand written note dated Comes with a glossy photography of Mosley and the black shirts. Comes with third party authentication. Nice collectors piece of British union of Fascist memorabilia. Comes within its own card ready for mounting within a frame. Size entirity: mm x mm Condition: superb throughout, no tears or rips. A wonderful British Military Set. The helmet and hand bell are becoming hard to find together, the warden was based in Stepney London, both items were purchased from the original family.

The helmet marked with two large white W to front and back, has some paint loss to oneside, please see photos. To the inside we see full stamp marks dating

HOW TO IDENTIFY A WW1 BRITISH BRODIE STEEL HELMET FROM A WW2 MK2 STEEL HELMET